"Jindal University Hosts Africa - India Youth Leadership Summit" - India Today

February 02, 2017

The Jindal School of International Affairs of O.P. Jindal Global University (JGU) hosted a day long Africa - India Youth Leadership Summit, at its Sonipat campus on 25th February, 2017. The event brought together more than 150 African students and diplomats based in India.

Youth represents 1.8 billion of the world's population today and they will form a crucial part of decision making processes in the future. The summit deliberated on harnessing the dynamic youth power in the Indian sub-continent and Africa to bring about a positive societal transformation.
 
Speakers at the event emphasised that through education and global connect, the youths of Africa will continue to march ahead in a growth trajectory to make Africa realise its dreams.
 
Professor Sreeram Chaulia, Dean, Jindal School of International Affairs, said, "There is a youth surge happening in both the continents. At 19.6 years as the median age, the African continent 'is the most youthful on the planet.' Demographically, the 'transformation of Africa' lies in the hands of this massive youth power."
 
Speaking about the conflicts and strife-torn states, Dr. Chaulia said, "Narrow identities and sectarian mind-set have often destroyed societies here in India and in Africa." 
 
Citing the forceful change of the Libyan regime and conflicts of South Sudan and the Congo, he added, "There are challenges, even as we celebrate the youthfulness of the continents and give ourselves a sense of hope. There is something for all of us, especially Africa and India, to come together and to strike a kind of common understanding of social aspiration and how these can be translated into policy making and reality."
 
His Excellency, Yeah Samake Niankoro, Ambassador Extraordinaire and Plenipotentiary, Republic of Mali to the Republic of India, narrated to the gathering an inspiring tale of a young boy who came out from the shackles of poverty and hardship to become an accomplished achiever of his country. Addressing the African students in the audience, he said, "More than anything, Africa needs you. You are the leaders of tomorrow. From our 54 countries of Africa, we all know things are not at their best yet. We are waiting for you to make this happen because you are the privileged Africans who got the chance to come and study in India."
 
Speaking about the African community at large, he urged the youth to aspire. "The world will not be a better place if the youth does not play its proper role and to do so one needs to be equipped with, one needs to be prepared, you need to acquire the proper knowledge to put yourself above your own personal need. Go beyond individual to acquire necessary skills to go back home and make a significant impact in your communities' back home in Africa."
 
"Africa has always been community-driven. The world is walking back from individual to community. Africa has already invested in you through your parents, through your community and through your government," he added.
 
Sami M. A. Maraja, First Secretary, Libyan Embassy,  spoke about Libya's ongoing tryst with democracy. He said, "This is the tax of democracy. This is the tax of freedom. One cannot take freedom for granted. We should fight for freedom and this is what we are doing." He stressed on the importance of being aware of what is happening in Africa and the need to deeply understand what led to the ongoing strife in Libya.
 
The day-long summit witnessed detailed deliberations about people-to-people relations between India and Africa. Participants agreed in unison to see Africa realise its dream away from violence by reorienting youth with education, mobility and knowledge-sharing.
 
Tchinda T. Armand, Vice President of Association of African Students in India (AASI), said, "Development of Africa should be done on mutual effort of accomplishment with the collective vision of the leaders with the same vision. Africa should develop fast so that we can maintain the same living condition throughout the globe. Youth is the spirit of any nation, so achievement of this transformation mainly lies on the effort of the children of mother Africa put together."
 
Prof. (Dr)Tapan Kumar Panda, Dean, Jindal Global Business School, talked about the changing realities of Africa and the demand for employment generation. Both the continents are facing similar challenges where a large number of youths are looking for opportunities. Dr. Panda said, "Let us not look back. Let us take community participation to an entrepreneurial engagement."
 
The summit was a collaborative effort of JGU's Centre for African, Latin American and Caribbean Studies(CALCAS) and the Association of African Students in India (AASI). Panelists included academicians, international affairs experts and student leaders from African continent.
 
 
Jindal University Hosts Africa - India Youth Leadership Summit
SONIPAT, India, February 27, 2017
 
The Jindal School of International Affairs of O.P. Jindal Global University (JGU) hosted a day long Africa - India Youth Leadership Summit, at its Sonipat campus on 25th February, 2017. The event brought together more than 150 African students and diplomats based in India.
 
Youth represents 1.8 billion of the world's population today and they will form a crucial part of decision making processes in the future. The summit deliberated on harnessing the dynamic youth power in the Indian sub-continent and Africa to bring about a positive societal transformation.
 
Speakers at the event emphasised that through education and global connect, the youths of Africa will continue to march ahead in a growth trajectory to make Africa realise its dreams.
 
Professor Sreeram Chaulia, Dean, Jindal School of International Affairs, said, "There is a youth surge happening in both the continents. At 19.6 years as the median age, the African continent 'is the most youthful on the planet.' Demographically, the 'transformation of Africa' lies in the hands of this massive youth power."
 
Speaking about the conflicts and strife-torn states, Dr. Chaulia said, "Narrow identities and sectarian mind-set have often destroyed societies here in India and in Africa." 
 
Citing the forceful change of the Libyan regime and conflicts of South Sudan and the Congo, he added, "There are challenges, even as we celebrate the youthfulness of the continents and give ourselves a sense of hope. There is something for all of us, especially Africa and India, to come together and to strike a kind of common understanding of social aspiration and how these can be translated into policy making and reality."
 
His Excellency, Yeah Samake Niankoro, Ambassador Extraordinaire and Plenipotentiary, Republic of Mali to the Republic of India, narrated to the gathering an inspiring tale of a young boy who came out from the shackles of poverty and hardship to become an accomplished achiever of his country. Addressing the African students in the audience, he said, "More than anything, Africa needs you. You are the leaders of tomorrow. From our 54 countries of Africa, we all know things are not at their best yet. We are waiting for you to make this happen because you are the privileged Africans who got the chance to come and study in India."
 
Speaking about the African community at large, he urged the youth to aspire. "The world will not be a better place if the youth does not play its proper role and to do so one needs to be equipped with, one needs to be prepared, you need to acquire the proper knowledge to put yourself above your own personal need. Go beyond individual to acquire necessary skills to go back home and make a significant impact in your communities' back home in Africa."
 
"Africa has always been community-driven. The world is walking back from individual to community. Africa has already invested in you through your parents, through your community and through your government," he added.
 
Sami M. A. Maraja, First Secretary, Libyan Embassy,  spoke about Libya's ongoing tryst with democracy. He said, "This is the tax of democracy. This is the tax of freedom. One cannot take freedom for granted. We should fight for freedom and this is what we are doing." He stressed on the importance of being aware of what is happening in Africa and the need to deeply understand what led to the ongoing strife in Libya.
 
The day-long summit witnessed detailed deliberations about people-to-people relations between India and Africa. Participants agreed in unison to see Africa realise its dream away from violence by reorienting youth with education, mobility and knowledge-sharing.
 
Tchinda T. Armand, Vice President of Association of African Students in India (AASI), said, "Development of Africa should be done on mutual effort of accomplishment with the collective vision of the leaders with the same vision. Africa should develop fast so that we can maintain the same living condition throughout the globe. Youth is the spirit of any nation, so achievement of this transformation mainly lies on the effort of the children of mother Africa put together."
 
Prof. (Dr)Tapan Kumar Panda, Dean, Jindal Global Business School, talked about the changing realities of Africa and the demand for employment generation. Both the continents are facing similar challenges where a large number of youths are looking for opportunities. Dr. Panda said, "Let us not look back. Let us take community participation to an entrepreneurial engagement."
 
The summit was a collaborative effort of JGU's Centre for African, Latin American and Caribbean Studies(CALCAS) and the Association of African Students in India (AASI). Panelists included academicians, international affairs experts and student leaders from African continent.